Gold Gets Flashbacks From Fries at Daglas And Trumpets The Six Burger

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The Six burger with Maudite Photo: Hadley Tomicki

S. Irene Virbila must think she's Jonathan Gold or something, wrapping up seven of her favorite brunch spots in one article. Ammo is sort of like her own version of Gold's El Parian or Nancy Silverton worship, and she praises their eggs and pork belly "bacon." Bouchon has a good brunch, surprise surprise, while Canele, LA Mill, Hungry Cat, and Gjelina get nods, too. And she's already a fan of Salt's Cure, quickly becoming L.A.'s most buzzed about newcomer. [L.A. Times]

Jonathan Gold is used to the Dodgers' dismal late-season performance and also appears tired of pork belly, hoping to see intestines overtake their current popularity. Fortunately, he gets distracted by the fries at Daglas Drive-In, not the city's best but great for nostalgia. Much like watching depressing Dodger games just to hear the golden chords of Vin Scully, he turns his attention from the average burger for fried spud sticks that "taste like an older Los Angeles, where every neighborhood had a burger stand like this one." [L.A. Weekly]

Jonathan Gold tries to deal with food snobs who are over the term "gastropub," before calling Pico's hit-or-miss eatery The Six "a useful restaurant." He offers, "the Israeli-Palestinian conflict may well be solved by the time your food actually gets to the table," but thinks you'll like the superior ingredients that make up casual classics like their burger, mac and cheese, and wood-roasted shrimp. He also drops a reference to Cannibal Corpse!! [L.A. Weekly]

Sherry Irene Virbila steps into Santa Monica Place, picking Xino as a jumping-off point. She's not blown away by a menu she imagined as more compelling and only seems enchanted by the salt and pepper prawns. Everything else, from a duck wonton soup to a rack of kurobata, underwhelms her. [L.A. Times]

Want to visit Noodle 101 Express but dying for ideal dumplings? Mr. Gold admits you might find the interpretation of dumplings there a little funny, but not to worry, Din Tai Fung is across the street with their famous soup dumplings, critics and Giang Nan maniacs be darned. [L.A. Weekly]

Unlike Mr. Gold, Merrill Shindler is looking to pork belly to tell him what the hell is going on with the economy. A visit to Manhattan Beach's new Kah reveals just what is really packing South Bay folk into restaurants, pan-Asian, Thai-heavy cuisine. He deems Kah "a Thai restaurant with special guest appearances by neighboring cuisines. And the mix works very well." [Daily Breeze]